soloontherocks:

neoliberalismkills:

angeloatemychickenwings:

product-of-a—horror-film:

okay I always see the popular pictures and gifs of him being a badass but seeing him in his natural habitat is awesome as heck

HE LOOKS SO CUTE IN GLASSES

skeleton guy wears glasses

(via withallmyparts)



haymitchdrinksfirewhiskey:

ediebrit:

oh my fucking god

SOMEONE FINALLY SAID IT.

SHOTS FIRED.

(via aquastargazer)


If people sat outside and looked at the stars each night, I bet they’d live a lot differently. When you look into infinity, you realize there are more important things than what people do all day.
Calvin and Hobbes  (via helywillums)

(via aquastargazer)


londonandrews:

 

Convincing two photographers to shoot me in a rainstorm with all their camera gear… floating around a warm rock Quarry in Rochester NY… Magic.

londonandrews:

 

Convincing two photographers to shoot me in a rainstorm with all their camera gear… floating around a warm rock Quarry in Rochester NY… Magic.

(via wwwbeautifullensecom)



Why oh why isn’t every season of living single on DVD

blackgirlsbirthedtheearth:

This hurts. 


soulbrotherv2:

The Kaiser’s Holocaust: Germany’s Forgotten Genocide and the Colonial Roots of Nazism by David Olusoga & Casper W. Erichsen
On 12 May 1883, the German flag was raised on the coast of South-West Africa, modern Namibia - the beginnings of Germany’s African Empire. As colonial forces moved in , their ruthless punitive raids became an open war of extermination. Thousands of the indigenous people were killed or driven out into the desert to die. 
By 1905, the survivors were interned in concentration camps, and systematically starved and worked to death. Years later, the people and ideas that drove the ethnic cleansing of German South West Africa would influence the formation of the Nazi party. The Kaiser’s Holocaust uncovers extraordinary links between the two regimes: their ideologies, personnel, even symbols and uniform. 
The Herero and Nama genocide was deliberately concealed for almost a century. Today, as the graves of the victims are uncovered, its re-emergence challenges the belief that Nazism was an aberration in European history. “The Kaiser’s Holocaust” passionately narrates this harrowing story and explores one of the defining episodes of the twentieth century from a new angle. Moving, powerful and unforgettable, it is a story that needs to be told. [book link]

soulbrotherv2:

The Kaiser’s Holocaust: Germany’s Forgotten Genocide and the Colonial Roots of Nazism by David Olusoga & Casper W. Erichsen

On 12 May 1883, the German flag was raised on the coast of South-West Africa, modern Namibia - the beginnings of Germany’s African Empire. As colonial forces moved in , their ruthless punitive raids became an open war of extermination. Thousands of the indigenous people were killed or driven out into the desert to die.

By 1905, the survivors were interned in concentration camps, and systematically starved and worked to death. Years later, the people and ideas that drove the ethnic cleansing of German South West Africa would influence the formation of the Nazi party. The Kaiser’s Holocaust uncovers extraordinary links between the two regimes: their ideologies, personnel, even symbols and uniform.

The Herero and Nama genocide was deliberately concealed for almost a century. Today, as the graves of the victims are uncovered, its re-emergence challenges the belief that Nazism was an aberration in European history. “The Kaiser’s Holocaust” passionately narrates this harrowing story and explores one of the defining episodes of the twentieth century from a new angle. Moving, powerful and unforgettable, it is a story that needs to be told. [book link]

(via wwwbeautifullensecom)



king-emare:

vmagazine:

Jamel Shabazz: Street Photographer

Charlie Ahearn’s Film Retraces a Moment in New York Style - Video 1 / / 3

As a teenage photographer in early 80s East Flatbush, Brooklyn, Jamel Shabazz set out to document the then nascent movement of hip-hop. Through the iconic style of his MCs, neighborhood kids and gang members, the unequivocal attitude of New York’s youth was recognized as the calling card of the city’s creative renaissance. Published in 2001, Shabazz’ first book Back In The Days was celebrated as an exhilarating snapshot of the times, and his visual flair has been brought to life in a new documentary by the legendary hip-hop historian and director, Charlie Ahearn.  “On the cover of Jamel’s book were two young men on 42nd Street. They were captured posing in such strong form as a kind of respectful bulwark against all the chaos that you see around them on ‘The Deuce,’” explains Ahearn, the notable filmmaker also responsible for the classic old-school movie, Wild Style. “I immediately knew that here was an original artist for our time.” [1]

©jamel shabazz.all rights reserved

I wish

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)


lascasartoris:

Easter Sunday (top-bottom)

  1. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  2. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  3. Harlem 1943 by Weegee
  4. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  5. South Side, Chicago 1941 by Russell Lee
  6. Harlem 1947 by Henri Cartier Bresson
  7. South Side, Chicago,. 1941 by Edwin Rosskam
  8. Harlem 1940 by Weegee
  9. Harlem 1955 by William Klein
  10. Harlem (W. 117th St. and Seventh Ave) 1939

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)


beautifulsouthasianbrides:

Photography: Pink Pixel & Fräulein Zuckerwatte

"Glamorous Indian Inspired Bridal Shower Decor"


dopest-ethiopian:

I look so hip

dopest-ethiopian:

I look so hip

(via devoutfashion)



cosascool:

Forests Drenched in Light and Fog by Boguslaw Strempel

(via naturallypolished)